Even with Good Reason

Crammed in a corner of a booth, Marta watched the flurry of snow outside obscure the street. There were two people she didn’t know sitting across from her.   The storm had ushered everyone inside and the owners didn’t want to kick anyone out. It was uncomfortable – Marta was a reporter, used to talking to people, but she was also used to being prepared. Being invaded by this couple made her feel as if she was back home.

They were bickering. It was whispered – hissed, really. Marta kept wanting to wipe nonexistent spit off her face. She tried hard not to look at them, but her plate was empty and her book was too dense to concentrate on in the louder-than-usual bustle.

Another similarity to home, that overcrowded air. Different, though, was the fact that the diner seemed to have been invaded, whereas home had never been any different. She clenched her fist and caught the couple staring at it. She took it off the table and hid it in her lap, turning a page of her book with the other hand even though she hadn’t taken in anything on the previous page.

She glanced out again. There was no one in the street that she could see, but then they might be behind the first or second or third curtain of snow.

There were a million reasons for why she was sitting alone – more alone than she’d have felt if there was no one else at the table with her – and at least half of those were reasonable. But a deep, black rage bubbled inside her and she had to put her book down to be able to clench her other fist in her lap.

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6 thoughts on “Even with Good Reason

  1. I know, I’ve been gone a while! (New blog address, btw. Ha.) Anyhow, it’s not surprising that I love this. You always pull me right in with your characterization. The people you write about appear real – they aren’t fake, but well-rounded. I want to know more about Marta and all of her troubles.

    K.

  2. Erin M says:

    (1) not-so-positive memories of home; (2) bickering couple across from her . . .

    Love the hints you’ve given us and how you’ve left everything open to interpretation.

    Sort of an aside: It must be really difficult to be a reporter or an interviewer. All that research they have to do for every story, and how quickly they have to report on things . . !

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